Automating the import of hundreds of sprites to Construct

I’m making a game where an area of ground is broken piece by piece. I managed to create a python script that uses a voronoi pattern to shatter my image into several small irregular pieces. Here’s how that looked:

I then needed to import those 200 pieces into Construct. I figured out that if I set the position of each piece to 0,0, they would form the full image perfectly. After that I can just crop the pieces to their actual pixels and things work really nicely: the voronoi jigsaw puzzle comes together like it should.

The only pain point I had left was importing 200 sprites one by one into Construct. I knew that I could drag them all at the same time on top of Construct, which would create an animation. But I needed to create several individual sprites instead of animation frames.

The real life saver in this situation turned out to be the Project Folder feature in Construct (works best in Chrome), since it gives direct access to the project file structure. So here are the steps I performed and the scripts I used:

Please don’t attempt this with your production code, instead start a new empty Construct project and save it as a Project Folder on your local hard disk

1. Use a Python script to loop through all the image files in a folder and have it generate the JSON files Construct expects to have in the objectTypes folder. Here is the script for that (zipped due to security considerations). To run that, just unzip, place it in the same folder with the images, open a terminal there and type: python generateProjectJSON.py and hit enter. A bunch of JSON files should appear which you should copy to your Project Folder’s objectTypes folder.

2. Next the project.c3proj file needed to have the files listed in the items array in this manner:

“objectTypes”: {
“items”: [
“myImage_0”,
“myImage_1”,
“myImage_2”
],

So made a script to generate the array. Note that this is a very simple script and could be improved to support more files name conventions. At the moment it is just adding an incrementing number at the end of each image name. This script will output a simple array in a file called names.txt. Copy the array to your project.c3proj file.

3. The images needed to be renamed with -default-000.png appended to their file name. Time for another script, run this similarly in the folder with the images. After that I copied the images into the images folder inside the Project Folder.

4. That’s basically it but I also wanted the sprites already placed in the layout at coordinates 0,0 so I wrote one more script to do that. Run this script where you have your JSON files (that we generated earlier) and it will give you a new file called new_layout.json. Take the “instances” array from the generated file and merge it with your Layout 1.json file (which can be found in the layouts folder).

Now just reload the project and something magical happens: all your images will appear in the project and in the layout! Even if it’s hundreds or even thousands of images.

So there we have it. This workflow is obviously not useful if you just need to import a small number of sprites. But if you needs hundreds, then this can definitely save you some frustrating manual labor.

Finally, an insanely good pixel art AI

As a 2D game creator, I have been searching for an text-to-pixel art generator AI for a long time. It looks like we have finally arrived! Check out the results I got for the prompt

“a sprite sheet of several pixel art doors”!


Wow! Those are INSANELY good compared to previous pixel art generative AI’s!

So by now you must be dying to know which tool I used to generate those and how much it costs! Well I have good news for chatGPT users! I used Dalle-3, which you can now use for free with a chatGPT subscription! That’s right, since I already subscribe to chatGPT, I generated those awesome images for free!
This is getting really exciting for indie game developers everywhere!

Download a basic empty WordPress Block theme

If you are looking to download a basic, barebones WordPress block theme to test this new feature in WordPress, look no further. Below is a download link to a basic empty block theme, generated with the Create Block Theme plugin from the WordPress developers. Simply unzip this file into your themes-directory, activate it in the themes section of the dashboard and you should be good to go.

Basic block theme

How to pause browser execution when F8 is not working

Let’s break down a simple trick that can help you manipulate and understand your code better.

To begin with, access your developer console. This can usually be found in your browser’s Developer Tools under the ‘Console’ tab. Depending on the browser you’re using, you might need to use different shortcuts (like F12) or methods to open it. But don’t worry, a quick search on how to open the developer console in your specific browser should get you on the right track.

Once you’ve opened the console, the next step involves entering a particular command. All you need to do is simply paste the provided command line in the console. This is what we’re going to use to manipulate our code. After pasting the command, hit the ‘Enter’ key to execute it.

document.addEventListener('keydown', function (e) {

if (e.keyCode == 119) { // F8

debugger;

}

}, {

capture: true

});

Now, your code should still be in an ‘unpaused’ state. But when you press F8 on the keyboard, it should pause. It’s like freezing a moment in time, letting you thoroughly inspect and understand how your code behaves for specific elements. This can be especially useful when debugging hover-effects and mouseovers.

With this simple trick, your web development toolkit has a new superpower! Experiment, explore, and let your code reveal its secrets to you. Happy coding!”

Batch rename objects in Blender

Today, we will tackle an essential aspect of 3D modeling in Blender – object naming.

It’s easy to lose track of your objects’ names, especially when you’re working on a complex project. All too often, we find ourselves with a sea of objects, each bearing an unhelpful name like ‘cube’, which doesn’t do much to tell us about their function or importance in the scene.

However, fear not! Blender offers a convenient tool for mass renaming of objects, allowing you to maintain order and clarity in your work. Let’s walk through the steps.

Firstly, you need to select the objects you want to rename. If your objects are neatly organized in a collection, simply right-click on the collection and choose ‘Select Objects’. Alternatively, if you’re dealing with individual objects, click on the first object, hold down ‘Shift’, then click on the last object. This selects those two objects and all others in between.

With your objects selected, hit ‘Control’ and ‘F2’. This brings up the ‘Batch Rename’ dialogue box. Here, you’ll specify the current name string you want to change – in this case, ‘cube’ – and what you’d like to replace it with. Click ‘OK’, and voila! All your selected objects are now renamed, saving you from any future confusion.

If you ever forget the shortcut, remember that you can always find the ‘Batch Rename’ option under the ‘Edit’ menu.

That wraps up today’s tutorial! We hope you found this helpful in managing your 3D workspace. Thanks for watching and remember to subscribe for more quick and easy Blender tips. Until next time, this is One Minute Video Tutorials.com, making your Blender journey a breeze, one minute at a time.

Remove weird box characters from pasted text in VS Code

Today, we’ll be discussing a common issue you might encounter when copying and pasting text from other programs into Visual Studio Code.
At times, you may notice strange boxes appearing in your pasted text. These boxes represent unrecognized characters in VS Code. They usually occur due to discrepancies between character encoding standards across different programs.

If you’re looking for a quick fix to eliminate these, here’s a simple process you can follow:

First, select and copy one of these unknown box characters. Next, open up the ‘Replace’ dialog box. Paste the copied box character into the ‘Find’ field of the dialog box. Then, leave the ‘Replace’ field blank. Upon clicking ‘Replace All’, VS Code will replace all instances of this unrecognized character with nothing, essentially removing them from your text.

And there you have it! Your pasted text is now free of any unknown characters.

Thank you so much for watching and see you next time on OneMinuteVideoTutorials.com